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Chitosan Hemostat

Chitosan Hemostat

Absorbable Hemostat

(Chitosan Hemostat)



Chitosan is a linear polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed ß-(1-4)-linked D-glucosamine (deacetylated unit) and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (acetylated unit).

It has a number of commercial and possible biomedical uses.

Chitosan hemostatic agents are often chitosan salts made from mixing chitosan with an organic acid (such as succinic or lactic acid). The hemostatic agent works by an interaction between the cell membrane of erythrocytes (negative charge) and the protonated chitosan (positive charge) leading to involvement of platelets and rapid thrombus formation.

The chitosan salts can be mixed with other materials to make them more absorbent, or to vary the rate of solubility and bioabsorbability of the chitosan salt. The chitosan salts are biocompatible and biodegradable making them useful as absorbable haemostats. The protonated chitosan is broken down by lysozyme in the body to glucosamine and the conjugate base of the acid (such as lactate or succinate) are substances naturally found in the body.

Chitosan's properties also allow it to be used in transdermal drug delivery; it is mucoadhesive in nature, reactive (so it can be produced in many different forms), and most importantly, its positive charge under acidic conditions. This positive charge comes from protonation of its free amino groups.

Lack of a positive charge means chitosan is insoluble in neutral and basic environments. However, in acidic environments, protonation of the amino groups leads to an increase in solubility. The implications of this are very important to biomedical applications. This molecule will maintain its structure in a neutral environment, but will solubilize and degrade in an acidic environment.

This means chitosan can be used to transport a drug to an acidic environment, where the chitosan packaging will then degrade, releasing the drug to the desired environment.

Product Pictures

Chitosan Hemostat

Chitosan Hemostat